A Farewell to Amy

Emily with puppy Amy.

On Monday, a call to my friend, Nina, confirmed what I feared. She had to put down Amy, her faithful companion of fifteen years. Anyone who’s ever had a dog knows just how painful and sad a day that was.

I can still remember the day Nina called to tell me she and her daughter Emily adopted Amy at the local pet store. They were especially drawn to this dog who bore a remarkable resemblance to my then-aging dog, Brandy. They weren’t sure Steve, Nina’s husband, would approve. Steve, who was born and lived his entire life in Manhattan, never had a dog. Of course, he fell for Amy, and I must say, I think Steve was responsible for sneaking the dog more treats than the rest of the family combined.

While we enjoy a singular relationship with our own dog, we also have relationships with our friend’s dogs. I had a special fondness for Amy. Not long after Nina’s family adopted her, my twelve-year-old Brandy passed away. And though Amy’s resemblance to Brandy was part of what endeared her to me, she had a totally different personality. She was much sweeter and gentler.

Nina spends summers up at her house in the Catskills and every year I drove up for a visit with Brandy, and later with my new dog, Lucky. While Amy preferred my visits to their apartment in Manhattan, where she received my undivided attention, she tolerated Lucky . I’ll never forget the night Amy repeatedly tried to come into our bedroom, only to be met with a growl from Lucky. Every time I started to nod off, they’d wake me. After I  positioned myself in the middle of the bed with Lucky on one side and Amy on the other, we finally all fell asleep.

Two summers ago, I had to leave Lucky home in South Carolina when I flew up to New Jersey for a wedding. I drove up to the Catskills for a few days, and Amy greeted me with wild abandoned when I pulled in the driveway. Since I’m an early riser, I would take her out for a walk first thing every morning. I allowed her to decide the route. The amazing thing is that each morning she took me someplace different.

One morning she was headed in a direction that I didn’t recognize. I said, “No, Amy. Let’s go this way.” She just stared at me with that knowing look only dogs have until I finally gave in and followed her lead. Of course, after we reached the end of the road, I remembered having walked that way once many years earlier. By the end of my visit, I realized that Amy had taken me on a walk to every one of the places I’d ever walked with her, Nina and Lucky over the years. Remarkable, no? Almost as if she were saying, “You remember this, don’t you?”

I know many people pooh-pooh the idea that dog’s have feelings and thoughts like humans, but I’m a firm believer they feel all the same emotions we do. They just don’t talk, and maybe that’s why we love them so much better than people. When I returned to the Catskills for a really quick two-night visit this July, Amy could no longer take the long walks. Did she somehow know that the previous visit was our last chance to reminisce as we visited our previous haunts? I think she did.

I’ll miss Amy as I still miss my Lucky who passed away in February. If those names sound familiar to you, it may be because I dedicated my last book to them — both dogs are characters in the Holly and Ivy mystery series. They’re gone, but not forgotten, and I’m very happy they’ll live on in the stories I’ve written. In the meantime, I’ll smile as I imagine the two running around pain-free as puppies in that big dog park in the sky.

Guest Blog / My Mysterious Humorous Heaven

Guest Author Daisy Pettles

I turned 60 this year and promptly retired. I’ve always loved to write, and for the last 20 years focused on writing for a practical niche area–-education and Internet marketing—where I could do what I loved and still pay the bills.

Prior to retiring and taking up writing , author Daisy Pettles was a therapist and Internet entrepreneur.

Retirement put me back in that great and rare place where I suddenly had endless days without responsibilities. Everything was possible again—a luxurious feeling that I’d not had for a few decades.  Better still, I had the amazing trio of treasures—time, money, and experience—required to launch into riskier passion projects, like fiction writing.

I’ve devoured books my entire life, but fiction writing was a new adventure and a huge challenge. I love mysteries, romance, and humor so I decided to try my hand at humorous mysteries that harked back to my rural origins in southern Indiana.

Because I love to laugh, and am a bit quirky myself, I knew humor would under gird my first fiction project. I’d write what I wanted to read and see if I could pick up a readership from there.

That’s how my small-town Indiana setting, Pawpaw County, came into being for my award-winning “Shady Hoosier Detective Agency” series. I grew up in a tiny river town full of nosy neighbors, quirky characters, and kind-hearted souls.

Like many Baby Boomers born in rural America in the 60’s I found myself growing nostalgic for an America that never did exist, but that many still hope for. I wanted to write something light-hearted that celebrated small town living.

I deliberately set out to replicate the “feel good” mood of vintage Hillbilly TV sit-coms, those set in rural America. My childhood was awash in the silliness of great comic series like The Andy Griffith Show, Petticoat Junction, Gomer Pyle, and Green Acres.

When it came to creating leading ladies I decided to abandon the safe cozy mystery formula of the thirty-something, college-educated woman escaping to a simpler life in the country.

I created instead aging and somewhat cranky heroines who would love to retire but lack the resources to do so. They are very street smart, but lack the varnish and subdued manners that often accompany college and urban living. I love them to death.

My leading lady detectives, Ruby Jane Waskom and Veenie Goens, are working class, high-school educated, both with a prior chain of everyday jobs as factory and farm workers. They share a house, overdue bills, and laughter. They co-exist on social security, taking jobs as detectives in-training hoping to scrape up a little “Twinkie money” on the side.

They are much older than the genre usually allows: 68 and 71, to be exact. (Every literary agent I talked to loved the series and the writing but were horrified by the age of the women.) My leading ladies are unusual—and therefore very risky—for the cozy mystery niche today.

While the books are labeled cozy mysteries, their strongest element is humor. They are true crime comedies. One critic called Daisy Pettles the “hillbilly Janet Evanovich.” Another, in “Shelf Discovery” tagged them “a wildly entertaining (detective) team—like an elderly Stephanie Plum and Lula.” My senior crime fighting duo, Ruby Jane and Veenie, are very much a silly Lucy-Ethel gal pal team.

Much of what is good in the Shady Hoosier Detective Agency character-driven series is the way the two senior sleuths slide along together through life, and their cases. Their get-it-done “gal pal” energy enlivens the series.

My one goal as a writer is to entertain. I love it when people laugh, and feel even better when I might be cause of that laughter.

I have found enough of an audience with the Shady Hoosiers that Book 3, “Chickenlandia,” is coming out as I write this. Book 4,”Catfish Cooties,” is now steeping in the stew pot of my imagination.

Writing humorous fiction with mysterious twists is truly my retirement heaven.

AUTHOR BIO: Daisy Pettles’ debut humorous cozy series, the Shady Hoosier Detective Agency, set in fictional Pawpaw County, Indiana, won the 2019 Gold Medal as Best Humor Book from the Indie Reader, The Next Generation Indie Book Awards, and the American Fiction Awards. Prior to retiring and taking up writing she was a therapist and an Internet entrepreneur. The Chickenlandia Mystery is Book 3 in Daisy Pettles’ Shady Hoosier Detective Agency cozy humor series, which the Indie Reader describes as “Murder She Wrote meets the Golden Girls … where the fun is infectious.”

Visit her anytime at https://www.daisypettles.com

CONTACT: Daisy@daisypettles.com

TWITTER: @DaisyPettles

FB: https://www.facebook.com/daisypettles

Chickenlandia Mystery: Shady Hoosier Detective Agency (Book 3)

Release Date: 9/15/2019

PLOT: Pawpaw County, Indiana, is all atwitter about Ma and Peepaw Horton’s annual Chickenlandia Festival. The mood turns dark though when the Horton’s prize-winning rooster, Dewey, and his best laying hen, Ginger, vanish, leaving behind only a ragged trail of tail feathers. Also missing: Gertie Wineagar, local sourpuss, and BBQ chicken cook-off queen. Senior sleuths, Ruby Jane (RJ) Waskom and Veenie Goens, suspect Hiram Krupsky, Pawpaw County’s self-proclaimed Chicken Wing King, of master-minding the crime spree in an attempt to sabotage the Horton’s free-range chicken ranch. The sleuths get an unexpected “in” when Hiram commences to court a reluctant RJ. Follow the Hoosier senior snoops as they attempt to sort the good eggs from the bad in this hilarious, small-town crime comedy.

Shady Hoosier Detective Agency – AMAZON BUY LINKS

Ghost Busting Mystery (Book 1)

Baby Daddy Mystery (Book 2)

Chickenlandia Mystery (Book 3) – Due out 9/15/19 check link before posting

August Blog: The Dog Days of Summer

Here in South Carolina, the kids are already back in school. Personally, I think going back to school before Labor Day is an abomination and simply un-American. That may be why I simply can’t get myself motivated to sit down and finish the book I’m writing, even though I’m within spitting distance of the finale.

I get up every day with the intention of writing at least two hundred words — my bare minimum goal as per John Grisham’s advice — but I just don’t feel like it. Yesterday I received my weekly Inspiration for the Week from Cathleen O’Connor (cathleenoconnor.com). If you don’t subscribe to her emails, I highly recommend you do. This week’s message  was entitled “You Deserve a Break Today”. I felt as if she wrote it just for me. Thank you, Cathleen.

She began with a quote from writer Anne Lamott:

“Almost everything will work again if you unplug it for a few minutes…including you.”

I love that. Of course, I’ve been pretty much unplugged since I got back from my vacation at the end of July. You think I’d be re-booted by now.

I do have at least one legitimate reason for not writing the last two weeks. Each Monday when I sat down to type, my computer ground down to the slowest speed imaginable. On my own I was able to go to the settings  and determine that my 465 GB’s of storage were completely filled up. I knew that was impossible.  I managed to clear out the inordinate amount of temporary files that somehow downloaded themselves to my computer, not once, but twice.

When these phantom files were back again last week, I decided I needed professional help, so I  called my trusty IT guy, Peter Manse, out in Colorado. Guess what? He was in California for a brief vacation. Nevertheless, he managed to get me back up Wednesday. Somehow, starting something on a Wednesday just never feels right to me. Still, I managed to get one chapter completed last week.

And then there’s the new puppy. If you’re friends with me on Facebook, you already know I’ve adopted a new dog — Trixie.  She’s a sweetheart, but she’s only about six months old, so she needs lots of attention and exercise.  I still miss Lucky, my dog of 12 years, whom I lost in February, but I confess it’s so nice to have a little buddy once again. I mean, really. Is there anything more endearing than seeing that little tail wag when you walk in the room? Second only to a baby smiling at you. Really.

So, today, I’ve decided to take Cathleen’s advice and embrace Anne LaMott’s message and heed Cathleen’s own words:

“Just take some deep breaths. Ask yourself what you need to feel rested and restored . . . and then give that to yourself. “

Maybe next week — after Labor Day — I’ll start writing again in earnest. In the meantime, it’s a rainy day here in Mauldin this morning, so it won’t be at all difficult to go over to the couch, curl up with Trixie and finish that cozy mystery I’m reading — One Taste Too Many by Debra Goldstein.

Ah, yes. I think I’ll just release all guilt and totally indulge in what’s left of the remaining dog days of summer! Happy Labor Day, Y’all.

Do Writers Ever Retire?

GUEST BLOG by author Brenda Whiteside

When the company I’d been working for decided to close their doors, I made the leap to early retirement. Until then, I was a weekend writing warrior. I completed my first novel, Post-War Dreams, writing on the weekends and in fifteen-minute increments before I left for the day job. It took me a couple of years to get the book to publication. The first book I published and second book I wrote, Sleeping with the Lights On, was written within the same time constraints.

Guest Blogger: Brenda Whiteside

After I “retired,” my time became my own, and writing became my full-time endeavor. That was several years ago, and since then when people ask if I’m retired, I don’t know how to answer. If I say no, I’m an author, the verbal reactions run the gamut from oh wow to a flat oh. If I say I’m retired but I write, well, it sounds the way I’m sure they hear it…a nice hobby.

The thing is, if I’m retired, why am I so busy? Writing full-time as a published author ends up taking up way more time than working a day job and writing when I found a few minutes. Getting published and taking writing to the next level added all the business tasks to my plate…social media, promotion, goal planning, networking, and on and on.

I will say, reaching the age of retirement has enriched my creativity. My heroines benefit from my life experience, which is why I enjoy writing heroines over forty. All that baggage makes for more conflict and plot paths.

This month, I’m celebrating ten years since I signed my first writing contract for Sleeping with the Lights On. AND it is now available on audio in addition to eBook and print. Sandra Holiday is fifty and still searching for the perfect hero and career in her life. She does it with humor and sassiness. But there’s suspense brewing to keep her on her toes.

RT Book Reviews says ” Cheers to Whiteside for writing a heroine who exists outside of conventional romance novels in terms of age and marital status…novel is written with a pleasantly light sense of humor…

What’s Sleeping with the Lights On About?

A secret admirer, a redheaded stalker, and an eccentric millionaire have thrown Sandra Holiday on a dangerous path.

After two failed marriages and countless relationships, Sandra thinks she’s met the man to end her years of less than perfect choices; choices that not only derailed her travel-related career plans, but also left her single and broke.

Carson Holiday, a Las Vegas country crooner with swoon-inducing good looks, spent his adult life pursuing a recording contract and love, never holding on to either. After eighteen years, he drops back into Sandra’s life, reigniting an attraction he can’t deny.

Can this handsome, country crooner save the day, or will Sandra forever be Sleeping With The Lights On?

BUY LINKS

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Sleeping-Lights-Brenda-Whiteside-ebook/dp/B003N3V4LK

Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/sleeping-with-the-lights-on-2

Barnes and Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/sleeping-with-the-lights-on-brenda-whiteside/1021751737?ean=2940043324740

Google: https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Brenda_Whiteside_Sleeping_with_the_Lights_On?id=RNwdCwAAQBAJ

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/sleeping-with-the-lights-on/id1388815805?mt=11

AUDIO

Amazon Audible: https://www.amazon.com/Sleeping-with-the-Lights-On/dp/B07R7RRDDD/

Apple iTunes: https://books.apple.com/us/audiobook/sleeping-with-the-lights-on-unabridged/id1462229387

Brenda Whiteside is the author of suspenseful, action-adventure romance. Mostly. After living in six states and two countries—so far—she and her husband have decided they are gypsies at heart. They share their home with a rescue dog named Amigo while splitting their time between Northern Arizona and the RV life.

Visit Brenda at https://www.brendawhiteside.com

Or on FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/BrendaWhitesideAuthor

Twitter: https://twitter.com/brendawhitesid2

She blogs and has guests: https://brendawhiteside.blogspot.com/

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003V15WF8

Goodreads Author Page: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3972045.Brenda_Whiteside

BookBub: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/brenda-whiteside

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brendawhitesideauthor/

That’s What It’s All About

Happy Memorial Day! Hope you are enjoying a great kick-off to the summer season. In spite of the fact that I am hosting the family cook-out today, I wanted to take a moment to share with you a reflection that makes me smile and hope it does the same for you.

I’m sure by now you’ve seen the Apple Watch commercial set to the tune of a childhood favorite of mine — the Hokey Pokey. From the first time I saw it, I was hooked and no matter how many times I see it again, I’m always filled with glee.

Remember Robert Fulgham’s book, All I Really Needed to Know I Learned in Kindergarten? The older I get the more profound I find the simple things we learned as children. The other day at our mailbox kiosk, someone posted a sign that read: “Take the outgoing mail. Whoever delivered mail yesterday didn’t take it.” Seriously? What happened to “please” and “thank you”? Clearly, the writer who penned that note missed school that day.

But back to the Hokey Pokey commercial.  When I see those people dancing, jumping, playing to the tune, I’m exhilarated. And what could be more profound than the simple words “You put your whole self in…That’s what it’s all about.”

This summer, I hope you do nothing half-heartedly and that you put your whole self into everything you do. What chance do you have to be truly happy if you don’t? I mean, why bother doing anything, if your whole self isn’t in it? I’m especially talking to my fellow retirees out there. We have less in front of us than we have behind us. Why waste a single minute?

Just in case you need a little more inspiration, click below.

Happy Summer!

Book Review: Steeplejack by A.J. Hartley

If you love to read, you probably also love discovering new authors. It doesn’t matter if they are well-established authors. If they are new to you, you feel the joy of discovery. And what a special treat to find an author who’s written a series. Knowing that, after you finish that first book, you have more  adventures with the same characters to look forward to is sheer delight.

Delighted to meet AJ Hartley at SinC meeting in May.

Earlier this month I had the pleasure of meeting ,  A.J. Hartley, aka Andrew Hart, who spoke at our local Sisters in Crime meeting, recounting his journey  to becoming an international bestselling author of novels spanning a variety of genres.   He has written several archaeological thrillers, the Darwen Arkwright children’s series, the Will Hawthorne fantasy adventures and novels based on Macbeth and Hamlet. And as if that wasn’t enough to keep him busy, he is also the Robinson Distinguished Professor of Shakespeare at UNC Charlotte.

For me, AJ’s talk was one part informative, one part inspirational and two parts humorous.  Afterwards I selected Steeplejack, the first in his three-book YA Fantasy series. The book’s protagonist and heroine, seventeen-year-old Anglet Sutonga, earns her living cleaning and repairing chimneys and towers in the city of Bar-Selehm,  “an industrial city resembling an alternate Victorian South Africa.”

Anglet is a Lani. In the culture of the Lani people, the first daughter is a blessing, the second a trial, the third — a curse.  Anglet is a third daughter.  Nevertheless, she is a talented climber and excels at her job. She is also independent and fierce, characteristics that draw us to her immediately.

Near the end of the story, when Anglet is on the run and in great peril, she encounters a black weancat with a collar, a creature with whom she feels a kinship. She muses that the collar is a “collar of the mind” that you could simply refuse to believe in, and without the collar “all the cat had was itself: muscle and sinew, claw tooth and bone, senses, experience, skill, instinct and roaring, blood-pumping animal need.”  She, of course, could be describing herself — or any of us, for that matter.

I loved this character and I loved this book. The story is gripping, the action, non-stop, the setting, hauntingly beautiful — the language, soaring.  No wonder more and more adults are turning to Young Adult literature.  Can’t wait to finish reading the series.

Ode to Emily on Beltane Day

That beautiful smiling face you see belongs to Emily Miller, daughter of my friends Nina and Steve. I was Emily’s confirmation sponsor and although that means my primary responsibility is to provide her with “prayerful support and guidance in her Christian life”, I choose to honor her on a pagan holiday — Beltane. Why?

Well, let me tell you about Emily. The first thing you need to know is that she’s brilliant. She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. After college she worked as a paralegal in New York City. During that time she seemed to find “her calling” — a deep interest in the environment.

Next, Emily left NYC for Denver where she spent a few years and worked for the Chef Ann Foundation (www.chefannfoundation.org) whose mission is “To provide school communities with the tools, training, resources and funding that enables them to create healthier food and redefine lunchroom environments.” That experience led Emily to decide she was ready for law school. She is now enrolled in UC Berkeley Law School focused on food and environmental policies.

I am in awe of this young woman, who, I believe, can succeed at anything she sets out to do. And that’s why I was delighted when her mother told me she was working on a paper focused on policies to implement the Green New Deal. Now, I know many people feel that the Green New Deal is an impossible dream. But I’ve got news for you. It’s not just a pipe dream if Emily’s working on it.

If you’ve read my blogs over the years, you know I’m a Pollyanna — a cockeyed optimist. But I can’t help myself, especially when I realize our future is in the hands of intelligent, diligent and thoughtful young people like our Emily. In just a few years, they will come into their full powers and I just hope I’m around to see the wonders they’ll achieve.

But you may still be wondering, why I picked Beltane to write this ode to Emily? Well, May 1, Beltane, is the Gaelic May Day. On this day in Ireland, rituals used to be performed to protect cattle, crops and people, and to encourage growth. And, after all, isn’t that what Emily is working on? With her on the job, I’ll sleep better, knowing the Earth is in good hands.

As I am inspired today, I paraphrase words that inspired me so many years ago:




Some men see things as they are and ask why

She dreams things that never were and asks why not?”

Under the Tuscan Sun

What do all of the above pictures have in common? You guessed it. I’m smiling. Hard not to when you’re in Tuscany for seven straight days of sunny weather.

I confess I have been struggling to meet my personal goal of writing a blog every month. Last year I only managed to post seven blogs, and this one is only the second this year. But when I looked at my pictures and saw the enormous grin on my face in every one, I figured this blog would practically write itself. After all, a picture is worth a thousand words, so I won’t need to add too many more.

Our patio in Vecchiano

My trip to Italy all began with a phone call from my friend, Janet Adams Strong early this year. She told me she and her husband, Bruce, were renting a house in Vecchiano and she was calling to invite me to visit them there.  Does it get better than that?  And let me tell you, better hosts than Janet and Bruce don’t exist on the planet. From the moment I arrived, we embarked on an Italian holiday I will long remember.

Oh, by the way, on this trip I learned the secret to beating jet lag. First, after being picked up at the airport, enjoy driving around the countryside admiring the stands of cypress trees, vineyards and olive groves. Stop at a fruit stand along the way. Visit a supermarket. When you reach your destination, have a drink. Talk. Take a walk around town, checking out the architecture, the local church and the cemetery. (The cemeteries are really something to see.) Upon completion of your walk, build a fire and grill food outside. Talk some more and, of course, drink some more. That should get you to nightfall. When you absolutely can’t keep your eyes open anymore, go to bed. When you wake up, you will be ready to roll — no jet lag. I swear by this method.

During my seven-day stay, we visited: Lucca, known for its well-preserved Renaissance walls and its cobblestone streets; Pisa, where I posed for the must-have tourist shot as I took my turn holding up the tower; San Gimignano and its majestic skyline of medieval towers encircled by 13th century walls; and Livorno, a port city with a breath-taking waterside promenade with checkerboard paving.

Perhaps my favorite excursion was our visit to the family-owned vineyard Frattoria San Vito. Matteo, the owner, took us on a tour of the vineyard and olive grove, followed by a delightful bit of wine-tasting on the back patio. The weather was perfect, the wine was superb, the bruschetta delicious and the olive oil to die for. I think the first picture up top picture captures the moment perfectly. We particularly enjoyed Matteo’s reference to one of their red wines as their “all-day wine.”  So much better a description than “everyday wine,” don’t you think?

An Italian cemetery.

Through all of these adventures, my dear friend, Janet drove through the narrow streets and maneuvered the multi-pronged roundabouts without trepidation. She’s a force to be reckoned with behind the wheel of a four-in-the floor automobile. Thank you, Janet, my fearless friend.

I had been to Italy when I got out of college, touring the great cities of Rome, Venice, Florence and Milan. I have wonderful memories of that trip, and  now, I’m so glad I had the chance to experience la dolce vita in the countryside of Tuscany. Because Elton John said it better than I could, I leave you with his words on Italy:

I love places that have an incredible history. I love the Italian way of life. I love the food. I love the people. I love the attitudes of Italians.” -– Elton John

Trip the Light Fantastic

Mary Poppins 1964

In the summer of 1964, I was 13 years old and the last thing I wanted to do was go see Mary Poppins. My younger sister, Mary Ellen, at age 10, wanted nothing more. I remember feeling so resentful at being forced to go with her. After all, I was a teenager all of three months at that point.

When we got to the theater in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, the line to get in was formidably long, and I refused to stand in line. And so I was spared the ignominy of being a teenager at a children’s movie and I returned home and listened to my Beatle’s albums instead.

I confess that I felt conflicted because Mary Ellen was so disappointed. But, being the determined little thing she was, and still is, she managed to get to see the movie with someone else…not me a week or so later. I have always regretted that episode because I knew how much it meant to her, but, in my adolescent insecurity, I just couldn’t bring myself to go to a kid’s movie. I let her down.

Fast forward to last week. Mary Ellen and I went to see the latest Mary Poppins movie. This time she didn’t need to coax me. We  laughed when we bought the tickets. “Two seniors for Mary Poppins.” Quite a different attitude from 1964.

Mary Poppins 2019

We, of course, loved the film. Like Mary Poppins herself, it is “practically perfect in every way”. I read an interview with Emily Blunt and she said she remembered the original movie, calling it a “joy bomb”. Well, this movie is beyond that. Multiply joyful by a hundred. Call it a bliss bomb.

Trip a Little Light Fantastic was my favorite part of the movie. I loved it so much that I decided it will be my motto for 2019. My favorite lines:

“So when life is getting scary, be your own illuminary
Who can shine their light for all the world to see
As you trip a little light fantastic with me”

As we embark on this new year, I wish you twelve months of blissful brightness.

Happy New Year!

Stardust and the Power of Words

This morning I worked the crossword puzzle in the daily paper as I do everyday. One of the clues was “A Hoagy Carmichael Song”. The answer, of course, was Stardust. The word captivated me, so I googled the song and found it on Youtube.

I had heard that song many times in the past, but I never really paid attention to the words until I played that Youtube clip. As I listened to Hoagy croon his creation, I found myself entranced by the beautiful images he painted with words and marveled at his ability to create such beautiful poetry out of heartache.

Just felt I had to share that with you today.  To all my writer/reader friends out there, may the power of words be with you. If you have a moment, take a listen.( I’ve included the lyrics below the video.)

Stardust Lyrics

Sometimes I wonder why I spend
The lonely night dreaming of a song
The melody haunts my reverie
And I am once again with you
When our love was new
And each kiss an inspiration
But that was long ago
Now my consolation
Is in the stardust of a songBeside a garden wall
When stars are bright
You are in my arms
The nightingale tells his fairy tale
A paradise where roses bloom
Though I dream in vain
In my heart it will remain
My stardust melody
The memory of love’s refrain